REPRESENTATIVES from Chorley-based children’s hospice, Derian House,  travelled to London to lobby Lancashire MPs for more funding.

The charity, which offers respite and end-of-life care for more than 350 children and young people in the North West, costs £4 million to run each year – but less than 10 per cent of that is funded by the government and NHS.

For the remaining 90% of vital funding, the charity must rely upon the generosity of its supporters.

“Derian House saves the NHS literally millions of pounds every year,” said David Robinson, Chief Executive of Derian House. “But we are forced to rely on our supporters to come up with £4 million every single year just to keep the doors open.

“Our families tell us that the services we offer are a lifeline. It’s not just about supporting the children and young people, but also looking after the whole family. We offer a range of wellbeing services, sibling support and generally provide a safe haven for our families.

“Our goal is to make sure our children make the most of every moment and create happy memories with their families.

“It is hugely unfair that children’s hospices receive significantly less financial support from the government than adult hospices.”

Mr Robinson was joined by Derian’s Clinical Director Lynn Grayson and Communications and Marketing Manager Caroline Taylor for the trip to the House of Commons to meet Lancashire MPs at the meeting organised by Chorley MP Sir Lindsay Hoyle, a long-time supporter of the charity.

MPs who attended the meeting and agreed to visit Derian House were Julie Cooper (Burnley), Seema Kennedy (South Ribble), David Crausby (Bolton North East), a representative for Chris Green (Bolton West) and Mark Hendrick (Preston)

They were asked by the charity to join their fight for funding, and to have a louder voice in putting children’s palliative care on the agenda.

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Derian House Heads to Westminster in fight for funding

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REPRESENTATIVES from Chorley-based children's hospice, Derian House,  travelled to London to lobby Lancashire MPs for more funding.

The charity, which offers respite and end-of-life care for more than 350 children and young people in the North West, costs £4 million to run each year - but less than 10 per cent of that is funded by the government and NHS.

For the remaining 90% of vital funding, the charity must rely upon the generosity of its supporters.

"Derian House saves the NHS literally millions of pounds every year," said David Robinson, Chief Executive of Derian House. "But we are forced to rely on our supporters to come up with £4 million every single year just to keep the doors open.

"Our families tell us that the services we offer are a lifeline. It's not just about supporting the children and young people, but also looking after the whole family. We offer a range of wellbeing services, sibling support and generally provide a safe haven for our families.

“Our goal is to make sure our children make the most of every moment and create happy memories with their families.

“It is hugely unfair that children’s hospices receive significantly less financial support from the government than adult hospices.”

Mr Robinson was joined by Derian's Clinical Director Lynn Grayson and Communications and Marketing Manager Caroline Taylor for the trip to the House of Commons to meet Lancashire MPs at the meeting organised by Chorley MP Sir Lindsay Hoyle, a long-time supporter of the charity.

MPs who attended the meeting and agreed to visit Derian House were Julie Cooper (Burnley), Seema Kennedy (South Ribble), David Crausby (Bolton North East), a representative for Chris Green (Bolton West) and Mark Hendrick (Preston)

They were asked by the charity to join their fight for funding, and to have a louder voice in putting children's palliative care on the agenda.