Charity shop workers in Chorley have been overwhelmed by kindness after more than 2,000 bags of goods were donated in just ONE day.

Derian House Children’s Hospice set-up three special drive-through donation stations this weekend, to help people drop-off their goods in a quick and safe way.

But they were left flabbergasted when lockdown spring cleaners turned out in force, filling the charity’s huge storage warehouse with designer clothing, furniture, jewellery and white goods.

Andrew Upton-Ford, Retail Manager at Derian House Children’s Hospice, said: “We wanted to make sure that we had plenty of great quality stock in place for when we opened our charity shops to the public today (Monday), and we knew that many people had spent the extra time at home clearing out their attics and spare bedrooms.

“But we have been absolutely overwhelmed by the generosity of people who turned up with their cars packed to the brim. We’re still sorting through it all but we have already found some real gems, including designer bags and valuable pottery.

“Thank you so much to everyone who has donated. By giving your unwanted goods to Derian House, you are making a real difference to the lives of struggling families across the North West.”

In line with government guidance, the charity will store the donated items for 72 hours, before they are cleaned, steamed, and taken to the charity’s shops in Chorley, Leyland and Horwich to sell.

The charity’s Adlington shop has been converted into a storage warehouse where all stock will be taken for cleaning, and people can also drop-off donations.

Derian House Children’s Hospice looks after more than 400 children and young people with life-limiting conditions from across the North West, helping them make the most of every moment with their families.

The coronavirus pandemic meant the closure of its shops and cancellation of fundraising events, leaving a £250,000 black hole in the charity’s budget.

It costs £4.8 million to run services every year at Derian House, with just 3p in every £1 coming from statutory sources. For the remainder, the charity must rely on the generosity of its supporters.

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2,000 bags of help from lockdown spring cleaners

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Charity shop workers in Chorley have been overwhelmed by kindness after more than 2,000 bags of goods were donated in just ONE day.

Derian House Children’s Hospice set-up three special drive-through donation stations this weekend, to help people drop-off their goods in a quick and safe way.

But they were left flabbergasted when lockdown spring cleaners turned out in force, filling the charity’s huge storage warehouse with designer clothing, furniture, jewellery and white goods.

Andrew Upton-Ford, Retail Manager at Derian House Children’s Hospice, said: “We wanted to make sure that we had plenty of great quality stock in place for when we opened our charity shops to the public today (Monday), and we knew that many people had spent the extra time at home clearing out their attics and spare bedrooms.

“But we have been absolutely overwhelmed by the generosity of people who turned up with their cars packed to the brim. We’re still sorting through it all but we have already found some real gems, including designer bags and valuable pottery.

“Thank you so much to everyone who has donated. By giving your unwanted goods to Derian House, you are making a real difference to the lives of struggling families across the North West.”

In line with government guidance, the charity will store the donated items for 72 hours, before they are cleaned, steamed, and taken to the charity’s shops in Chorley, Leyland and Horwich to sell.

The charity’s Adlington shop has been converted into a storage warehouse where all stock will be taken for cleaning, and people can also drop-off donations.

Derian House Children’s Hospice looks after more than 400 children and young people with life-limiting conditions from across the North West, helping them make the most of every moment with their families.

The coronavirus pandemic meant the closure of its shops and cancellation of fundraising events, leaving a £250,000 black hole in the charity’s budget.

It costs £4.8 million to run services every year at Derian House, with just 3p in every £1 coming from statutory sources. For the remainder, the charity must rely on the generosity of its supporters.